Aneroid Sphygmomanometer

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Aneroid Sphygmomanometer
Category
Normal
Prehypertension
High Blood Pressure
Stage 1
Stage 2
Systolic
(Top Number)
Less than 120
120–139
140–159
160 or Higher
Diastolic
(Bottom Number)
Less than 80
80–89
90–99
100 or Higher
*A blood pressure of 130/80 mmHg or higher is considered high blood pressure in people with diabetes and chronic kidney disease.
How to Measure Your Blood Pressure:
A patient sits down and rests their arm on a table so the brachial artery is level with the heart.
A sphygmomanometer cuff is wrapped around the subject's upper arm, just above the elbow and a stethoscope is placed on the hollow of the elbow, over the brachial artery.
The cuff is 'pumped- up' to a pressure of 180mmHg, at the point where the pressure of the cuff is greater then the systolic pressure (the top pressure). The artery has collapsed and there is no flow of blood through the brachial artery.
The valve on the pump is loosened slowly. Once the systolic pressure is reached around 120mmHg (normal case), the brachial artery opens causing volatile blood flow, which cause vibrations against the artery walls. These noises are called Korotkoff sounds and can be heard through a stethoscope as the pressure exerted onto the brachial artery falls.
The blood flow through the brachial artery increases steadily, until the pressure of the sphygmomanometer cuff falls below the diastolic pressure (the bottom pressure), approximately 80mmHg. This is the point where the blood flow through the artery is laminar.
Sound:
(silence)
tapping
swishing
crisp
blowing
silence
Systolic
Diastolic
(in mmHg, millimeters of mercury)
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