Chemistry Chart

The term "chemistry chart" is most commonly associated with a list of all of the chemical elements: the periodic table, created by Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869. But a chemistry chart can be much more. It could be a Venn diagram to visualize a chemical combination, a flowchart showing how an experiment should be conducted, or a diagram showing organic compounds.

Chemical chart example

Typical Uses of Chemistry Charts

Chemistry charts are primarily used in education. Students use them for study material. Teachers and professors make use of them to illustrate lessons. Chemistry charts are also useful for showing chemical relationships and interactions.

Atomic guide

Pharmacists can use them to categorize chemicals and drugs. They help to inform patients about possible adverse reactions from combining different medications. For example, they may use a Venn diagram to show interactions between two or more drugs.

Chemistry flowcharts and decision trees usually consist of a series of different lines (lines that are different colors or styles) and many different shapes and symbols. They may employ standard flowcharting shapes, or specific scientific symbols. Either way, they are useful in both professional and academic endeavors.

Scientific symbols

How to Create a Chemistry Chart

There is a broad spectrum of chemistry charts. There are also many ways to create them. While chemistry charts can be created by hand, a more practical and efficient method is to use drawing software. Not only is it faster, but also gives your chart a professional look. Drawing software allows you to use a wide spectrum of colors, lines, shapes and tables. SmartDraw includes a wide selection of different chemistry chart templates along with hundreds of scientific symbols.

There are two more complex variations of the standard bar graph: a stacked bar chart and a clustered or grouped bar chart.